Ubuntu 22.04 LTS "Jammy Jellyfish" Full Review



The latest long-term supported Ubuntu release is here – Ubuntu 22.04 was released on April 21st. In this video, Jay will give you an in-depth look at this new release, including an overview of the new features, thoughts on the “snapped” version of Firefox, and also why Ubuntu’s GNOME implementation this time around can best be described as “FrankenGNOME”.

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# Individual sections
00:00 – Intro
01:31 – Installation process
02:45 – What new features can you expect in Ubuntu 22.04?
04:46 – Accent color customization
06:27 – Light mode as default (again)
07:36 – Wayland as default
08:55 – Ubuntu 22.04’s GNOME implementation (“FrankenGNOME”)
13:28 – Snap packages, and Firefox as a Snap

# Video-specific Links
Download Ubuntu 22.04 LTS ➜ https://ubuntu.com/download/desktop
Check out the full review of Ubuntu 22.04 here ➜ https://linux.video/ubuntu-jammy-install

## Recommended evergreen videos:
– How to create a bootable flash drive for installing Linux ➜ https://linux.video/flash-usb
– Understanding Linux permissions ➜ https://linux.video/perms
– OpenSSH Guide ➜ https://linux.video/ssh
– LVM Deep-dive ➜ https://linux.video/lvm
– How to better secure OpenSSH ➜ https://linux.video/secure-ssh

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#Ubuntu #Ubuntu22.04 #Linux

39 thoughts on “Ubuntu 22.04 LTS "Jammy Jellyfish" Full Review

  1. For me, I am more concerned about the operating system (Ubuntu and any Linux based OS) being stable on most computers with various hardware specifications than paying too much attention to trivial (in my view) shortcomings in visual and extreme user friendly design and features of the operating system; and that is because I have always been making it my duty to browse all the system files in order to figure out and comprehend which set of configuration files are responsible for each theme or application appearance and functionality that I would like to improve to my liking via manual editing of configuration and system files.

    From I started using my first my Ubuntu (10.04 LTS), I have been manually editing configuration and system files to create my own customized colourful (I hate dead colours called Neutral Colours) flavour of Ubuntu, and even compress my version of Ubuntu via squashfs to produce a hybrid bootable and installable ISO file. Ergo, based on the reviews for Ubuntu 22.04 LTS that I have listened, I can say that I confident to upgrade my customized colourful (Grub, Plymouth, Dash, Login, and other Desktop Accent Colours, Boot Animation, and Sounds) Ubuntu 20.04 LTS to Ubuntu 22.04 LTS without waiting until about September to upgrade as I customarily do.

  2. After watching your video I thought I would try 22.04 out but what a fail it was, I was unable to uninstall any software, the top corner is not showing a menu to shut down you have to click on the battery then you see the menu, home folder shows no install software, This is the worst Ubuntu I have used, its a mess, do not recomend

  3. I use Ubuntu in a 14 year old pc with Intel Core2 Quad CPU Q9550 and 8gb ddr2 ram. Coming from 20.04 LTS, 22.04 LTS feels like I upgraded my PC to a modern system. The computer is SUPER FAST, super smooth and very stable (I 've been using it since day 1). I was very skeptical installing 22.04 in the beginning because I was thinking that despite the requirements, the new OS would come heavy on the old pal. I was very surprised even with the installation process which has never been SO fast. I am very happy with the distro and the job Canonical has done. This is definitely my favorite version of Ubuntu and a huge turn towards their old self. Thanks for the video, but I think that you 've been a bit harsh on your judgement.

  4. Grr Wayland! For headless machines without physical monitors that use VNC to connect, it is a big pain requiring a hardware dongle to simulate a connected monitor.

  5. I wish they would have stuck with Unity. If they're gonna customize everything to the hilt, they're better off building it from scratch than mutilating that poor GNOME.

  6. I've just upgraded from 21.10 and I'm getting a strange error from GRUB, it's not starting at all. Strangely enough, when I choose an older kernel, it starts normally. I will meditate on this.

  7. Inexperienced user would be upset if looking for gedit – and 404 issued. So ubuntu has the updates ready upon request but kept it simple – give em a little bit of credit for not forcing their ecosystem down your throat..

    Edit I ve interested to know what $ free -h compares to the last LTS

  8. Points out that the text editor was held back due to a lack of testing, but version 42 of text editor is only up to release candidate status in the same video. Users can't test version 42 not because Canonical held it back, but because Gnome hasn't actually released version 42.

  9. After a kernel update broke my 2007 iMac's WiFi card on Fedora, I was forced to install Ubuntu. I did a minimal instal, no extra apps, so I could install everything my way: I installed Brave (my browser of choice) as an apt package from Brave repositories, uninstalled the Firefox Snap, and everything else I installed as a Flatpakeither from Flathub or Fedora remotes. The only thing that I could not make work was the Pop-Shell extention in order to have window tiling.

    I live Fedora's approach to vanilla gnome and this is the closest I could get while having my Broadcom BCM4321 wireless card working. Besides, since this iMac will eventually go to my aunt, I think LTS is the way to go.

  10. The biggest problem is as always the inclusion of snap, I always install deb if possible. That’s probably not a problem if you’re using a new computer, but the beauty of linux during the years that I’ve been using it in that it’s sleek if you want to. I am not good enough in math but I started before Slackware 1.0 was released, so it’s a couple of years ago. Anyway, this LTS is much better than every Ubuntu release the last 10 years, maybe even 12. It’s only snobs who complain, do you remember when you had to compile your Xorg by yourself to get a desktop? I can remember that one time in I 1996 I was so frustrated that I even bought an CDE CD and did install it on my computer. But then again GNOME or KDE didn’t exist. I’m okay with this frankenstein version, it feels solid on the desktop. Next week I’ll install a Gluster cluster, that will be fun since they’ve jumped up to a decent version now. Cheers guys 🍻

  11. The biggest problem is as always the inclusion of snap, I always install deb if possible. That’s probably not a problem if you’re using a new computer, but the beauty of linux during the years that I’ve been using it in that it’s sleek if you want to. I not good enough in math but I started before Slackware 1.0 was released, so it’s a couple of years ago. Anyway, this LTS is much better than every Ubuntu release the last 10 years, maybe even 12. It’s only snobs who complain, do you remember when you had to compile your Xorg by yourself to get a desktop? I can remember that one time in I 1996 I was so frustrated that I even bought an CDE CD and did install it on my computer. But then again GNOME or KDE didn’t exist. I’m okay with this frankenstein version, it feels solid on the desktop. Next week I’ll install a Gluster cluster, that will be fun since they’ve jumped up to a decent version now. Cheers guys 🍻

  12. I didn't really noticed anything messy about appearance of Ubuntu. They seem to be fixing what Gnome breaks. I think the desktop could be in completely different place if Unity 7 was not killed but evolve during those lost years. Mir was a mistake when Unity was not.

  13. Video suggestion… I suggest you create a video similar to "Minimal installation of Debian 11 (sid) with Gnome 40" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BheAxLgLm0A. Of course in your inimitable way, I presume you would actually explain what you are doing and why. See, I would guess many of your viewers are tired of Canonical pushing snaps on them. I suppose for many of your viewers installing Debian Stable, Unstable, or Testing would be a sensible method for moving away from distros based on Ubuntu.

  14. Accessory apps do not a desktop environment make. The version of your gnome install is about shell, settings, dock/panel/dash, overview, dialogs, and anything else actively enforcing a standard across apps.

  15. I can understand why canonical remove text editor and gnome console out of gnome 42. Console basically lacks of features and new text editor have inconsistencies with nautilus. Better to keep gedit and gnome terminal some more time.

  16. Interesting how accent colors makes your list of missing elements when mouse wheel scroll speed setting is still only possible with a chunky terminal command.

  17. The slow-launch issue with firefox snap isn't something you need to work around. It only happens the first time you run it. After that, it acts the same as the deb package, even after a restart.

  18. The 9 months support with the interim releases doesn't bother me. I always update to the latest release as soon as it's available. 22.04 is excellent, with some very fresh packages across the board, for now. When 22.10 is released, I'll update to that. I recently changed from using Debian Sid for my daily driver to Xubuntu with Cinnamon added. I don't have a problem with the snaps being used now in Xubuntu and all other ubuntu flavors.

  19. This was unfortunately a case of "damning with faint praise." Why would you want a long-term release that 1) doesn't have the full gnome 4.2, and 2) sticks you with snap ubuntu proprietary slow-loading snap packages? Among those negatives, he doesn't mention what for me is another one, that you can't theme anymore. I get bored with one look and like to have 4 or 5 nice themes I can switch among that go with editor themes. With this you're stuck with adwaita for 4 years as well. Ugh.

  20. I switched from POP OS to Ubuntu 22.04. For me 22.04 is running faster then POP OS, also i did have a lot of freezes in POP OS laste times.
    I also like the option to make the theme to my personal needs, the Dark Mode is really a Dark Mode in OS and Apps.

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